The red pandas, new targets of poachers in Asia

Ⓒ FREE THE BEARS/AFP – Handout – | Photo taken by the NGO Free The Bears on January 15,
2018 and obtained on February 7 by AFP from one of the three red
pandas rescued from poachers by the NGO in Luang Prabang,
Laos

Three red pandas, an endangered species, were rescued from
poachers in Laos last month, an unusual discovery that fears
environmental defenders the development of new traffic.

Laos, bordering China and Vietnam, is a hub in the global
wildlife trade, but the discovery of red pandas is exceptional,
experts say.

It was during a routine check of customs on the border
between China and Laos that six red pandas were discovered.

But only three of them survived and were transferred to a
Luang Prabang sanctuary run by the Free the Bears NGO in
northern Laos, where they are being treated.

Ⓒ FREE THE BEARS/AFP – Handout – | Photo taken by the NGO Free The Bears on January 15,
2018 and obtained on February 7 by AFP from one of the three red
pandas rescued from poachers by the NGO in Luang Prabang,
Laos

“They spent the initial quarantine period of two weeks,
which allowed us to move them into larger cages, where they
have more room to climb,” AFP spokesperson Rod Mabin told AFP.
the NGO Free the Bears.

The group broadcast videos of the three survivors with their
long red tails, munching leaves and eating fresh fruit while
occasionally glancing at the camera.

These red-haired cat-sized mammals, native to the Himalayas
and southwestern China, should not be confused with the giant
pandas of China.

This endangered species has been on the International Union
for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List since 1960,
largely because of habitat loss, but also because of extensive
poaching.

“It’s a very unusual discovery, and they were most likely
destined for a private zoo or exotic animal trade,” says Rod
Mabin.

According to initial findings, they were on their way to
Thailand, destined to become pets, added Ang Phuri Sherpa,
director of the NGO Red Panda Network, which emphasizes the
need for countries to make “additional efforts to curb the
illegal trade”.

According to a report by IUCN,
interest in red pandas “as pets could have increased,
particularly because of the growing number of” crisp images “of
these animals shared on social networks.

Terms of service